Max’s Thriving In The Global Arena

Max’s Thriving In The Global Arena

Max’s Restaurant’s has gone a long way since it was established in 1945 right after the end of World War II after it opened its first restaurant at 21 Scout Tuazon, Brgy. Laging Handa, Quezon City. Over the years, the popularity of Max’s has spread not only in the country but overseas as well. It has opened a branch in California and other places in the United States. Furthermore, the restaurant that is popularly known as “the house that fried chicken built” has also started operating in Canada. Plans to open other restaurants in other countries are in the pipeline. At present, Max’s Restaurant currently has over 127 branches in the Philippines. The chain also has branches in the U.S. states of California, Hawaii, New Jersey and a Nevada branch soon to open. It has 2 locations in Canada in Toronto, Ontario and Vancouver, British Columbia with a new location in Edmonton, Alberta opening soon. In 2015 Max’s opened branches in: Sydney, Australia; Dubai, United Arab Emirates; and Queens, New York. Indeed, Max’s Restaurant is an iconic brand in the country. To continue the tradition of excellence in entrepreneurship, the second and third generations of the family continue to introduce dynamic leadership and innovation to continue carrying the standards and traditions set by Maximo Gimenez and Ruby Trota to the brand. As part of its innovative leadership, the management opened its doors to franchising in the second quarter of 1998. Through the years, the company led by the young turks also went on a expansion mode as it acquired one brand after another. The company, as Max’s Group, currently...
A Life Committed To Health

A Life Committed To Health

A life outside the Philippines seems the only way for the Salimbangons to have a comfortable life – well paying jobs for IT manager Elton and registered nurse Cathy to save a lot for the family. Opportunities abound, but their status in U.S. was unsettling – they were working professionals, but not citizens in these countries. “We had working papers but we got tired of renewing it because it was tedious and very expensive (on their status in U.S.),” says the couple. That’s when they decided to come back to the Philippines in 2008 and finally settle. “We thought it was a sign to come home,” say Elton and Cathy, who worked in both countries for nine years, raised three kids and worked hard for the family. “From the income we earned, we only spent one-fourth for living expenses and the rest were kept as savings.” So Cathy came home with the kids with their savings, then Elton followed after six months. Sharing health The Salimbangons are frugal, who until now live simply with only a small portion of their earnings spent on food, education of the three children and health of the family. They live a life on things essential like education – their two daughters are back in Canada, studying college while one son is here – and health, which they believe is the only wealth in the world that they could share with others. Indeed, in 2009 they founded The Organique, the company which is into health and wellness, giving consumers products like Organique Acai Premium Blend, imported from the U.S. and now one of top-selling...
Mr. Softy’s Vic Perea Keeps His Cool Passion For His Ice Cream Business

Mr. Softy’s Vic Perea Keeps His Cool Passion For His Ice Cream Business

Almost everybody loves ice cream. As dessert or snacks, ice cream lifts up someone’s spirits amid life’s dragging existence. For only P10, a schoolgirl, a teenage boy or a working woman takes a break in a street corner, near a school or in a building’s lobby, then moves on. This little truth has inspired Victorino “Vic” Isidro Perea to sell ice cream called Mr. Softy in a public market in Marikina. It is soft served ice cream – easily done by an ice cream maker and served in a cone or a cup because it is not too thick – that Vic sells. After staying in the U.S. for two years, Vic returned to the Philippines in 2000 with his American experience, a second-hand ice cream maker which he got for $4,000 and started doing business. He knows how to sell ice cream because he was once the sales manager of Presto ice cream. “My experience in Presto ice cream inspired me a lot to pursue the business,” he says. Starting with one employee in his first store in Marikina, Vic now has almost a hundred people and 71 stores involved in the family-owned Mr. Softy Ice Cream, Inc., the pioneer and leading ice cream company in the Philippines today. “We treat our employees fairly and establish a good relationship with them. Also, we always see to it that dealing with our suppliers and customers is always fun and professional,” he says. The ice cream family Vic, who serves as president and CEO, is proud of his ice cream business, a family business which he runs with his entire...
Creating And Advocating A Logistics Technology That Can Save Lives

Creating And Advocating A Logistics Technology That Can Save Lives

Life’s meaning is sometimes elusive; you seek it but you cannot find it. But, at times, you chance upon its meaning accidentally. It was the fate of Salvador “Buddy” Silva Jr. III that he found meaning after his father died from a car crash. Grieving had pushed him not to despair but to inspiration. A logistics expert, Buddy thought of a system that will help people how to drive on the road safely and efficiently. With a team of software engineers, he created a total logistics control system that will track a company’s assets – its people and vehicles. “If we devote all our passion and creative minds on how we can standardize safety in every corner, straight or curved streets in highways, we can save more lives and help our community, country and perhaps, the world to avoid such destructive loss of loved ones brought by a sudden and tragic death from a vehicular accident,” he says. Sharing technology Losing his father led Buddy to find a solution that would help companies monitor people on the road, their exact location, their directions and other vehicles. His system called Safesat GPS tracking system – which he now shares with companies – ensures the safety of people and vehicles by tracking their whereabouts 24 hours a day, seven days a week. With its vibration sensor and accelerometer, Safesat can inform the motorist if he overspeeds, hits the brakes or accelerates harshly, also if there’s fuel theft and change of route. This helps the motorist drive safely and lessens fuel consumption, resulting in increased productivity and savings. “I realized that technology is all about...
Beefing Up Mario Tan Ong’s Family Business

Beefing Up Mario Tan Ong’s Family Business

From making clothes for people to providing chilled beef to meat shops, Mario Tan Ong has turned a family-owned business alive and mooing. In 2006, Tan Ong, president of D’Meter Fields Corp., started by selling fattened backyard grown cattle, and he has been slaughtering and selling them as chilled beef carcasses to meat shops since 2008. The company holds office in Quezon City and has a 20-hectare farm in San Simon, Pampanga, where Tan Ong fattens nearly 3,000 heads of imported cattle per quarter. Tan Ong said their cattle are imported from Australia “where they have more consistent quality compared to the local backyard cattle we see when we travel across the country.” D’Meter Fields Corp., which initially employed 50 people, ventured into building its own abattoir, complete with cold chains facilities, bringing the total number of employees to over 150. “Our relationship with our employees is excellent. Suppliers and customers are like partners to us,” he said. “Both our employees and the people we consider as partners trust us, and in return, we make sure we are worthy of that trust.” Meat shops Tan Ong has been providing the country’s major meat shops with chilled beef carcasses, which are made into different unbranded prime cuts like short loin (for T-bone and porterhouse steaks), sirloin, ribeye and tenderloin. “We supply many of the major meat shop chains in Luzon,” he said. “Most Filipinos want to see fresh beef carcasses hanging from hooks in meat shops and wet markets. They usually buy them warm or chilled beef—not frozen,” he said. “Usually, imported boxes of commercial grade meat are the frozen...
Learning The Ropes Before Going To The Top

Learning The Ropes Before Going To The Top

When their children graduate from college, parents who have a family business usually ask their children to join the business. However, Bryant William Cuison took a different route. The 34-year old business management graduate of De La Salle University opted to work in the corporate world to hone his background in business. He also has a Master’s in Entrepreneurship from the Asian Institute of Management. Cuison, general manager of Wilkonstruct Corp, worked first with SM Malls for the first three years of his corporate life. He then joined Ayala Land Inc. (ALI) until 2014. “I gained valuable exposure working with these two property heavyweights,” says Cuison. “In SM, I was exposed to the development of condominiums. Meanwhile, I learned valuable knowledge on property development in ALI,” adds Cuison. In 2014, Cuison learned from his father that he was needed to join the business because he was told that it was time for him to slow down. “My father asked me to take over the business because he wanted to retire. Together with my brother, we took over the business,” says Cuison. The Cuison patriarch worked as an architect in several countries until 1990. His return to Pangasinan led him to the establish Cuison Builders. “My father saw vast reconstruction opportunities in the Northern Luzon right after the 1990 tremor,” notes Cuison.  Cuison Builders was later incorporated into Wilkonstruct. Wilkonstruct, built on a strong, customer-oriented foundation, is into general construction services like design and build and project management. Its team of construction professionals has helped the family-owned enterprise grow into a reliable, fast and cost-efficient company. Cuison says the corporate experience...